IF YOU CANNOT WORK AT YOUR REGULAR JOB, YOU SHOULD INVESTIGATE WHETHER YOU ARE ELIGIBLE FOR SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY OR OTHER BENEFITS!!

The most universally available source of disability benefits is the Social Security Disability Insurance program (SSDI). If you don’t have the earnings history to qualify for SSDI, you can qualify for the Supplemental Security Income program (SSI) with the same medical proof. However, to receive benefits from either Social Security program, you must show more than just the inability to work at your regular job. Other disability programs require less of a showing in order to receive benefits. And there are other programs that can provide monetary or medical benefits if you can’t work. See the FAQs Section below for more information.

Kim has worked for many years on behalf of the disabled pursuing Social Security benefits, and has an excellent record. He has received praise for his work from many specialists in the field, including witnesses called by the government to testify against his clients.

To receive Social Security benefits, you must present proof that you can neither perform your regular work, nor realistically adjust to other work for at least 12 months because of a medical condition (mental, physical or a combination.) If you are terminally ill, you should also qualify for benefits.

You need not wait 12 months before applying. Call Kim LaValley and find out more information about how to apply.

Social Security offers two basic disability programs to which general members of the public can apply: SSI andSSDI. Upon establishing eligibility AND qualification, both will provide monthly payments and medical benefits, however, SSDI pays much better, and provides more comprehensive medical benefits. If in doubt about which to apply for, apply for both. (They both use the same application form.)

In Social Security proceedings, as in most every disability program, the specific wording of the doctor’s report(s) is crucial. It is important that your doctor understands the medical terminology as used in Social Security proceedings, An attorney can help insure that your doctor’s intentions are accurately understood by those who will be reviewing your file from a legal perspective!

Many people who have suffered from injury or disease, physically or mentally, have also suffered in their ability to work. Whether a result of a sudden accident, slowly developing condition(s), illness, physical or mental conditions, or any combination of these, the inability to work is a traumatic event. Kim understands this and knows that moving the case along as quickly as possible is crucial!

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)


Are Mistakes Made?

Unfortunately, all the time. Someone, whether a government worker, board, or insurance claims representative reviews the application for benefits, and makes a determination of eligibility. This person can make mistakes. Also, the supporting medical information for your claim may not include the proper medical-legal terminology or analysis to adequately support your claim. This can result in a denial of benefits in cases where they should be paid.

You have the right to appeal decisions made against you. You should pursue all appeals. An appeal from the initial decision is a crucial part of the proceeding. Once a judge rules against you, there is usually very little that can be done to win. Since it usually costs no more to involve an attorney early on, and an attorney’s involvement can make a tremendous difference in the outcome, you should consult with an attorney as early as possible to help insure the best results.

EARLY INTERVENTION WORKS!


What Can An Attorney Do?

Kim LaValley will perform two important functions in connection with a review of benefit programs:

  • He evaluates which program(s) may potentially provide you with disability benefits and determines whether your condition (physical, mental or a combination) should entitle you to disability benefits, and
  • He represents clients who are disabled from their regular work, or all work, and want to pursue disability benefits


How Are Attorney’s Fees Paid?

Attorney’s fees in Social Security proceedings are limited by law, and are only payable upon a SUCCESSFUL resolution of the claim. Fees are paid from the lump sum of “back-due” disability payments owed to you…There is no “up front” cost to the client in having an attorney pursue your claim, and all attorney’s fees requests must be reviewed by a judge, found to be reasonable, and approved before payment is due. Other types of disability cases are charged differently.

I Have A Disability, And I Believe I Have Been Discriminated Against Because Of It. Is There A Remedy?

It of course depends if you qualify for protection under the law. There are California and Federal laws prohibiting discrimination on the basis of disability, but claimants need to prove they are disabled as defined in the particular statute, and that a specific prohibited action was taken against them because of it. The remedies vary considerably depending on the statute relied upon, and the facts of the case. The issues are complex and questions should be answered by an experienced attorney.

One thing is clear: THERE ARE SPECIFIC TIME LIMITS TO FILE A CLAIM. LETTING THE APPLICABLE TIME LIMIT PASS WILL PRECLUDE ALL FURTHER ACTION.

Contact Kim LaValley for a free consultation or referral.


Social Security is not the only source of disability benefits. Click here for more important information about other programs that can provide support when you need it.

Have A Question? 
Contact Kim LaValley now!

(530) 362-7188
or
(877) 233-8399

Kim Lavalley Esq Social Security Disability Lawyer